The different personality types in the workplace and how to work effectively with each

personality types in the workplaceThink about your office for a second. I’m willing to bet that there is quite the variety of people working under that one roof. Having different personality types in the office is what makes a company dynamic… if everyone was the same, your company might not be as successful. It is important to understand the different personality types in your office, and also learn how to work effectively with each of them…since some personality types can mesh better than others. Learning to work effectively with the different personality types will make your work experience easier and help you achieve professional growth.

Here are the basic different personality types in the workplace and how to work effectively with each:

The “Commander”

The “Commander” is goal oriented, focusing on individual tasks and the end result. They want to be in charge, and they make decisions quickly, sometimes even before they have all of the details. They can sometimes come across as rude or condescending – but most often don’t mean to. They have a clear path in mind, and are convinced that everyone else should come with them, without question. These people work best alone or in a leading position.

Working with this personality

The Commander can be intimidating, a “professional bulldozer” that requires you to firmly stand up to them. Don’t, and they’ll simply run you over (and although challenging, working with this kind of personality can be great not only for your personal but professional growth). If you work together, you’ll need to be as strong and confident as they are. If this is your subordinate, assign individual projects whenever you can rather than group projects.

The “Adventurer”

Always looking for the next challenge, Adventurers are goal-oriented, with very high expectations for themselves. They are very secure, high energy and need variety.

Working with this personality

The Adventurer is a natural debater simply because “challenge” is their key driver. If this is your coworker, step right in and become part of that debate; brainstorm ideas together. If this is your subordinate, he/she needs lots of variety and change, so give him her projects to start rather than finish.

The “Stabilizer”

This personality is a steady, slow sort, and works perfectly in a team setting. People with this personality like routine and the status quo. They aren’t comfortable with risk. Flexible and agreeable, they get along well with everyone else and don’t like conflict or disagreement.

Working with this personality

This personality is the perfect coworker or subordinate.Hand them any task and they’ll get it done thoroughly, by the due date – including anything the aforementioned Adventurer starts. This self-effacing personality does not need lots of accolades or approval – but since they’re so well-deserved, give them anyway, and learn to recognize and praise their work and their professional growth.

The “Perfectionist”

Another personality that’s introverted and prefers to work alone, they are very cautious and will check their work multiple times before they turn it in. They’re very analytical and logical, detail-oriented, and aren’t afraid to simply dig in and go through everything with a fine-toothed comb. Unlike the Stabilizer, the Perfectionist is more likely to get frustrated and to express it.

Working with this personality

This is another personality that doesn’t like conflict and tends to be quiet and shy but not antisocial – it’s just that he or she prefers to work alone. Casual conversation is unnecessary, so don’t be put off by that. They also avoid conflict at all costs.

If someone with this personality type is your subordinate, you can hand them particularly difficult quandaries to solve and they’ll have no problem simply sitting down and figuring things out, as long as you give them the time to do so. It’s imperative that you recognize this as a boss, not only for the health of your work environment but for your own and their professional growth.

Which personality type are you? How do you work effectively with different personality types at your office? Comment below!

image credit: www.kiplinger.com






This entry was posted in Educational and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>